Global Studies

  • Department Information

    Global Studies

    Jennifer Pribble, Coordinator (Political Science)

    Global Studies is a rigorous but flexible interdisciplinary major with a cross-cultural emphasis. The major offers the opportunity to take courses across departments and schools at the University of Richmond and requires at least a semester of study abroad. Students majoring in Global Studies select one of four concentrations, each coordinated by advisors with special expertise in the areas.

    All students majoring in Global Studies take the gateway course, GS 290: Introduction to Global Studies, usually in the freshman or sophomore year; and at least one of two other introductory courses, GEOG 210 Planet Earth: People and Place or PLSC 240, Introduction to Comparative Politics. At least two advanced courses in a second language are also required, beyond the concentration. During the final year, after study abroad, all GS majors complete a topical capstone Senior Seminar, GS 400, during which they will research and write an original scholarly paper.  Successful completion of GS 290 is a prerequisite for GS 400.

    Students work with faculty advisors to choose additional electives, including courses taken abroad, within each concentration.  Course selections should comprise an interdisciplinary mix of courses from anthropology, art history, classics, communications, economics, environmental studies, geography, history, law, leadership, literature, music, political science, religion, sociology, theater, and women's studies. Within each concentration, eight units must be selected from three or more departments with no more than three units from a single department. While studying abroad students are encouraged to work with faculty advisors to identify courses not listed in the Richmond catalog that complement their academic program.

  • Major

    The Global Studies Major

    Note: The grade point average of the coursework comprising the major must be no less than 2.00 with no course grade less than C- (1.7).

    13 units, including:

    A. Foundational Study in Language and Culture

    Students specializing in Global Studies should be competent in at least two languages. For students whose secondary education was in English this requirement can be met by completing two courses taught in a language other than English at the 300 or 400 level in the departments of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures or Latin American, Latino and Iberian Studies. Students whose secondary education was not in English may satisfy the requirement with two units of world literature at the 300 or 400 level in any language (beyond the concetration).

    B. Approved Experience Abroad

    All Global Studies students should experience significant cultural immersion via a study abroad program of at least one semester in length, related to the major concentration. Students requesting an exception to this requirement (usually two summers) may submit a written petition to the program coordinator for review by a committee of Global Studies faculty.

    C. Global Studies Foundational Coursework and Capstone

    One unit, chosen from:
    PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics
    GEOG 210/GS 210 Planet Earth: People and Place

    Two courses required of all majors:

    GS 290 Introduction to Global Studies
    GS 400 Senior Seminar

    D. Global Studies Concentration

    Eight units selected from three or more departments with no more than three units from a single department

    Students are expected to fulfill all prerequisites necessary for courses within the major. Prerequisites do not count toward the major unless otherwise noted.

  • Cultures & Communication

    Global Studies: Cultures and Communication

    Advisors:  Tim Barney (Rhetoric and Communication Studies), Yvonne Howell, (Languages, Literatures, and Cultures), Tze Loo (History), Yucel Yanikdag (History)

    The concentration consists of eight units in at least three different departments or disciplines, selected in consultation with an advisor, structured as follows:

    Skills and Applied Courses

    Analytic and applied understandings of intercultural communications. Two courses, chosen from:

    ANTH 211 Field Methods in Ethnography

    ARTH 322 Museum Studies

    CLSC 252 Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

    ENGL 390 Literary Translation

    JOUR 100 News Media and Society

    LING 203 Introductory Linguistics

    MGMT 333 Cross-Cultural Management

    RHCS 350 Rhetoric in a Globalized World

    Complex Problems

    Explore challenges and stakes of efforts to communicate across borders, cultures, assumptions, and beliefs. Two courses, chosen from:

    ANTH 300 Sexuality and Gender Across Cultures

    ANTH 306 Tourism and Anthropology

    ANTH 379 ST: Tech, Surveillence and The Media

    ECON 210 Economics of the European Union

    ENVR 322 The Global Impact of Climate Change

    HIST 236 Russian Empire, Soviet Union, and After

    HIST 240 Human Rights and Revolution in the Atlantic World (1750-1850)

    HIST 270 Early Islamic World

    HIST 329 Brexit: A History

    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia

    LLC 260 Literature and Social Change in Eastern Europe

    LLC 360 Representing the Holocaust

    LLC 346 Insiders and Outsiders: Arabic Encounters with the West

    PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism

    SOC 308 Sociology of War

    WGSS 203 Human Rights and Revolution in the Atlantic World (1750-1850)

    Area Studies & Contexts

    Investigate cultural specificity. Two units chosen from regional courses:

    Additional Concentration Electives

    Two additional courses, chosen from those above.

  • Development & Change

    Global Studies: Development and Change

    Advisors: Mary Finley-Brook (Geography and Environmental Studies), Manuella Meyer (History), David Salisbury (Geography), Jonathan Wight (Economics)

    Note: Within the concentration, the eight units must be selected from three or more departments with no more than three units from a single department.

    Eight units, including:

    ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

    Developmental Courses

    At least three core unit courses, one from each of the following groups:

    Group 1: Geographies

    GEOG 320 Power, Space and Territory: Geographies of Political Change

    GEOG 345/ENVR 345 Global Sustainability: Society, Economy, Nature

    GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic Development and Globalization

    Group 2: Politics and Policies

    ECON 260 Economic Policy

    ENVR 366 International Environmental Law

    PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations

    PLSC 351 Globalization

    PLSC 356 International Political Economy

    PLSC 360 International Development Policy

    Group 3: Human Experience

    ANTH 302 Medicine and Health from a Global/Anthropological Perspective

    ANTH 303 Biopolitics in Medical Anthropology

    ANTH 328 Anthropology of Human Rights

    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia

    Area Studies Courses

    Three elective units covering at least two different 'developing' regions, selected from the regional courses or comparable courses of study abroad.

    Development Related Courses

    Possible additional electives from courses listed above, selected topics, courses studied abroad, internships, independent study, or the following courses:

    ANTH 300 Sexuality and Gender Across Culture

    ANTH 303 Biopolitics in Medical Anthropology

    ANTH 328 Anthropology of Human Rights

    ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics

    ECON 230/ENVR 230 Environmental Economics

    ECON 310 International Trade: Causes, Consequences, and Controversies

    ECON 360 International Macroeconomics

    GEOG 220/ENVR 220 Ecotourism

    HIST 391 Transnational Social Reform

    PLSC 359 Global Governance

    SOC 306 Social Change in a Global Perspective

    SOC 335 Feast and Famine: Inequalities in the Global Food System

    All students concentrating in Development are encouraged, but not required, to conduct independent research, in consultation with their GS faculty advisor. Summer research may be eligible for University funding.

  • Economics

    Global Studies: International Economics

    Advisor: Jonathan B. Wight (Economics)

    Core Teaching Faculty: Maia Kersti Linask (Economics), Jonathan B. Wight (Economics)

    Students are strongly encouraged to develop proficiency in economics with either a minor or double major (see Economics department listings for requirements).

    Note: Within the concentration, the eight units selected from three or more departments.

    Eight units, including:

    Three units, chosen from:

    ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union

    ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

    ECON 215 International Monetary Economics

    ECON 310 International Trade: Causes, Consequences, and Controversies

    ECON 315 International Macroeconomics

    Global Power, Politics, and Culture

    Two units from two different departments, chosen from:

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    GEOG 345/ENVR 345 Global Sustainability: Society, Economy, Nature

    HIST 236 Russian Empire, Soviet Union and After

    IBUS 381 International Business Environment

    MGMT 333 Cross-cultural Management

    MKT 325 International Marketing

    PLSC 356 International Political Economy

    SOC 335 Feast and Famine: Inequalities in the Global Food System

    History, Culture, Societies, Politics, and Religions of Regions or Nations in the World System

    Two units, chosen from:

    ANTH 303 Biopolitics in Medical Anthropology

    ANTH 307 Indigenous Peoples of the Americas

    ANTH 308 Latin America: An Ethnographic Perspective

     

    ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union

    ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

    ECON 215 International Monetary Economics

    ECON 310 International Trade: Causes, Consequences, and Controversies

    ECON 315 International Macroeconomics

    FIN 462 International Financial Management

    GEOG 210 Geographic Dimensions of Global Development

    GEOG 320 Power, Space, and Territory: Geographies of Political Change

    GEOG 333 Geographies of the Amazonia

    GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic Development and Globalization

    HIST 239 The French Revolution

    HIST 242 Modern Germany

    HIST 244 Propaganda State

    HIST 246 Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934

    HIST 250 Modern East Asia 1600-1960

    HIST 251 Chinese Revolutions

    HIST 252 Modern China: 1900-1940

    HIST 255 Meiji Japan: An Emperor and the World Named for Him

    HIST 261 Modern Latin America

    HIST 262 The Making of Modern Brazil

    HIST 271 The Modern Middle East

    HIST 272 The Ottoman Empire

    HIST 282 Africa in the Twentieth Century

    HIST 290 Britain and the World

    HIST 326 Communism

    HIST 341 History and Memory: WWII in East Asia

    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia

    IBUS 381 International Business Environment

    IBUS 390 International Business Issues and Topics

    IBUS 411 International Business Strategy

    PHIL 344 Contemporary Continental Philosophy

    PLSC 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics

    PLSC 312 Modern Political Theory

    PLSC 341 Humanitarian Intervention

    PLSC 343 Politics of Asia

    PLSC 344 Europe Today

    PLSC 345 Politics of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan

    PLSC 346 Politics of Cultural Pluralism

    PLSC 347 Politics of Developing Nations

    PLSC 348 Politics of Africa

    PLSC 349 Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean

    PLSC 350 American Foreign Policy

    PLSC 351 Globalization

    PLSC 355 International Relations of the Middle East

    PLSC 357 International Relations of East Asia

    PLSC 359 Global Governance

    PLSC 360 International Development Policy

    SOC 231 Across the Pond: Europe vs. USA

    SOC 232 Postsocialism in Russian and Eastern Europe

    One additional unit chosen from courses above.

  • Politics and Governance

    Global Studies: Politics and Governance

    Advisors: David Brandenberger (History), Stephen Long (Political Science), Jennifer Pribble (Political Science), Carol Summers (History)

    The concentration is comprised of eight units selected from at least three departments and in the following categories

    Diplomacy and World Order

    Two units, chosen from:

    ANTH 328 Anthropology of Human Rights

    ENVR 366 International Environmental Law

    GEOG 320 Power, Space, and Territory: Geographies of Political Change

    HIST 215 United States and the World Since 1945

    HIST 249 Cold War Europe, 1945-1991

    HIST 290 British Empire and the World

    HIST 341 History and Memory: WWII in East Asia

    PLSC 250 Intro to International Relations

    PLSC 350 American Foreign Policy

    PLSC 353 International Security

    PLSC 359 Global Governance

    RHCS 359 Media and War

    Economic Integration or Interdependence

    Two units, chosen from:

    ECON 105 Introduction to Global Economics

    ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union

    ECON 211 Economic Development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

    ECON 230/ENVR 230 Environmental Economics

    ECON 310 International Trade and Finance

    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia

    GEOG 345/ENVR 345 Global Sustainability: Society, Economy and Nature

    GEOG 370 Geographies of Economic Development and Globalization

    PLSC 351 Globalization

    SOC 306 Social Change in a Global Perspective

    SOC 335 Feast and Famine: Inequalities in the Global Food System

    World Regions

    Two units focused on the same world region selected from regional courses or study abroad.

    Additional Concentration Electives

    Two units chosen from the areas above.

  • Regional Courses

    Regional Studies Courses

    Africa

    ENGL 218 African Literature
    ENGL 331 Literatures of Africa
    FREN 328 Introduction to Magrhebian Literature and Culture
    HIST 281 Africa c. 1500-1900
    HIST 282 Africa in the Twentieth Century
    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia
    PLSC 348 Politics of Africa

    Asia

    ARTH 225 Art and Asia
    ARTH 226 Art and Culture of Japan
    ARTH 279 Asian Art
    ARTH 383 East Asian Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy
    ENGL 214 Literature of India
    HIST 250 Modern East Asia 1600-1960
    HIST 252 Modern China 1900-1940
    HIST 341 History and Memory: WWII in Asia
    HIST 390 Food and Power in Africa and Asia
    LLC 225 Chinese Culture and Civilization
    LLC 227 Action Genre in East Asian Cinema
    LLC 325 Revolution and Modernity in Chinese Literature
    LLC 355 Chinese Cinema
    MUS 125 Indonesian Theatre and Music
    PLSC 343 Politics of Asia
    PLSC 345 Politics of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan
    RELG 210 Healing and Medicine in China
    RELG 251 Sacred Arts of India
    RELG 268 Chinese Healing Arts
    RELG 352 Buddhism in India and Tibet
    RELG 355 Selected Asian Religions
    RELG 366 Buddhist Philosophy
    RHCS 412 ST: Rhetorics in South Asia

    Latin America

    ANTH 307 Indigenous Peoples of the Americas
    ANTH 308 Latin America: An Ethnographic Perspective
    ENGL 238 Readings in Caribbean Literature*
    ENGL 332 Literatures of the Caribbean*
    GEOG 333/ENVR 333 Geographies of Amazonia
    HIST 260 Colonial Latin America
    HIST 261 Modern Latin America
    HIST 262 The Making of Modern Brazil
    HIST 265 Gender & Sexuality in Latin American History
    LAIS 312 Introduction to Latin American Studies
    LAIS 314 Luso-Brazilian Studies: A Global Perspective
    PLSC 349 Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean

    The Middle East

    ANTH 350 Sex and Gender in the Middle East
    FREN 328 Introduction to Magrhebian Literature and Culture
    HIST 270 Early Islamic World 
    HIST 271 The Modern Middle East
    HIST 370 Contending Visions of the Middle East
    LLC 243 Politics and Social Movements in Modern Middle Eastern Literatures
    LLC 346 Insiders and Outsiders: Arabic Encounters with the West
    LLC 347 Islam, Nationalism, and the West: Modern Thought in the Arab World
    HIST 399 ST: Modern Turkey
    PLSC 355 International Relations of the Middle East
    RELG 230 The History of Israel
    RELG 281 Introduction to Islam
    RELG 287 Ninety-nine Names of God
    RELG 288 Saints and Sinners in Muslim Literature
    RELG 385 Sufism: Introduction to Islamic Mysticism

    Eastern Europe and Eurasia

    HIST 236 Russian Empire, Soviet Union, and After
    HIST 244 Propaganda State
    HIST 246 Russia in Revolution, 1905-1934
    HIST 249 Cold War Europe, 1945-1991
    HIST 326 Communism
    LLC 260 Literature and Social Change in Eastern Europe
    LLC 321 Introduction to 19th-Century Russian Literature
    LLC 322 Introduction to 20th-Century and Contemporary Russian
    LLC 331 Russian and East European Film
    LLC 335 Bolsheviks, Bombs and Ballet: Soviet Culture and Civilization
    SOC 232 Postsocialism in Russia and Eastern Europe

    Western Europe

    ECON 210 The Economics of the European Union
    ENGL 346 Twentieth-Century British and Irish Literature
    FREN 465 French Film
    GERM 472 Culture Wars & Identity Debates in German Society from Empire to EU
    HIST 242 Modern Germany
    HIST 248 European Diplomacy from Bismarck to Hitler
    HIST 249 Cold War Europe, 1945-1991
    HIST 329 Brexit: A History
    ITAL 311 Italian Culture and Society
    ITAL 411 Italian Identities: Sicily, Veneto, and Tuscany
    LAIS 305 Spanish in Politics and Society
    LAIS 311 Perspectives on People and Cultures of Spain
    LAIS 462 Visions of Contemporary Spain
    LAIS 465 Spanish Cinema
    PHIL 344 Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy
    PLSC 344 Europe Today

Courses

Expand All
  • GS 210 Planet Earth: People and Place

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to our earth as home to people and place through geographic approaches that analyze cultural, societal, economic, political, and environmental change. Topics include: human dimensions of climate change; sustainability; spatial analysis techniques and theories; population distributions and migration; cultural geographies; global economic development and its distribution; urbanization; political geography; and human-environment relations. (Same as Geography 210.)

  • GS 250 Selected Topics

    Units: 1

    Description

    Topics and issues in international studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

  • GS 290 Introduction to Global Studies

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduces methods and questions of the international studies field through regionally diverse case studies and analyses. Topics may include identity, culture, geopolitics, war, environment, health, media, migration, and inequality.

  • GS 350 Selected Topics

    Units: 1

    Description

    Selected topics in related subjects as arranged by the program coordinator. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of department.

  • GS 388 Internship

    Units: .5-1

    Description

    May be taken for a grade or pass/fail. Up to one unit may be applied towards the major, only when a grade is awarded. No more than 1.5 units of internship in any one department and 3.5 units of internship overall may be counted toward required degree units.

    Prerequisites

    Global Studies 290 and permission of department.

  • GS 390 Independent Study

    Units: .25-1

    Description

    Topics independently pursued under supervision of faculty member.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of department.

  • GS 400 Senior Seminar

    Units: 1

    Description

    Follow up on core concepts and approaches introduced in International Studies 290; sets of international issues and relationships are studied using tools and approaches of several disciplines. Seminar topics change from semester to semester. While readings are common, student's area of individual inquiry is, where possible, related to the concentration.

    Prerequisites

    Global Studies 290.

  • GS 406 Summer Undergraduate Research

    Units: 0

    Description

    Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.

    Prerequisites

    Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor