Biology

  • Department Information

    Biology

    Krista Stenger, Chair
    Professors Boland, de Sá, Hayden, Runyen-Janecky
    Associate Professors Brinkerhoff, Grayson, Hilliker, Quintero, Smallwood, Stenger, Treonis, Warrick, C. Wu, E. Wu
    Assistant Professors Carpenter, Pierce, Richardson, Skromne, Yang
    Directors of Biological Instruction Boone, Jones, Reiner
    Director of Biological Imaging Davis
    Director of Pre-Health Education Vaughan
    Managers of Biological Laboratories Berben, O'Donnell
    Stockroom Manager Joseph
  • Major

    The Biology Major

    Note: The grade point average of the coursework in biology and chemistry must be no less than 2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.7).

    For the Bachelor of Science Degree

    The B.S. degree in Biology provides a broad foundation in the biological sciences, and requires competency in closely related scientific disciplines and mathematics. It prepares students to integrate the natural and quantitative sciences.

    14 units, including:

    BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking or BIOL 192 Science Math and Research Training with Laboratory

    BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I

    BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II

    Five additional units in biology, including at least four approved courses at the 300 level and three with a lab. Students with one unit of research may take two of the five with a lab. The one unit of research may be satisfied by BIOL 394 (taken twice for 0.5 unit each), BIOL 395 (1 unit) or completion of BIOL 406 (summer undergraduate research) or by the department chair's approval of an external summer research program.

    CHEM 141 Chemistry: Structure, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics or CHEM 192 Science, Math and Research Training with Laboratory

    CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I

    CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II

    Quantitative-Physical Science Requirement

    MATH 211 Calculus I and two additional units chosen from the following three categories (must by chosen from two different categories):

    Category 1:

    MATH 212 Calculus II

    Category 2:

    MATH 209 Introduction to Statistical Modeling

    MATH 289 Introduction to Data Science

    PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses

    BIOL 320 Experimental Design and Biostatistics (BIOL 320 may count only for quantitative–physical science requirement or 300 level additional unit in biology, but not both)

    Category 3:

    CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing

    PHYS 127 General Physics 1 or PHYS 131 General Physics with Calculus I

    GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic Information

    Students are expected to fulfill all prerequisites necessary for courses within the major/minor. Prerequisites do not count toward the major/minor unless otherwise noted.

    For the Bachelor of Arts Degree

    The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree provides excellent training in biology while allowing the student flexibility to integrate interests in other academic disciplines with their biology coursework.

    14 units, including:

    Biology Courses:

    BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking BIOL 192 Science Math and Research Training I with Laboratory

    BIOL 200 Integrated Principles of Biology I

    BIOL 202 Integrated Principles of Biology II

    Five additional units in biology, including at least four approved courses at the 300 level and three with a lab. Students with one unit of research may take two of the five with a lab. The one unit of research may be satisfied by BIOL 394 (taken twice for 0.5 unit each), BIOL 395 (1 unit) or completion of BIOL 406 (summer undergraduate research) or by the department chair's approval of an external summer research program.

    Chemistry Courses:

    CHEM 141 Chemistry: Structure, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics or CHEM 192 Science, Math and Research Training II with Laboratory

    CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I

    Quantitative-physical science, one unit chosen from:

    MATH 209 Introduction to Statistical Modeling

    MATH 211 Calculus I or MATH 231 Scientific Calculus I

    MATH 289 Applied Regression Analysis

    CMSC 150 Introduction to Computing

    PHYS 127 General Physics 1 or PHYS 131 General Physics with Calculus I

    PSYC 200 Methods and Analyses

    BIOL 320 Experimental Design and Biostatistics (BIOL 320 may count only for quantitative–physical science requirement or 300 level additional unit in biology, but not both)

    GEOG 260 Introduction to Geographic Information

    Students pursuing a B.A. will work with their advisors to identify three or more thematically-linked courses outside of the sciences that demonstrate a thoughtful connection between their biology interests and another scholarly area (e.g., supporting study in science journalism, science and religion, bioethics, art in the sciences, history of science, etc.).  Only one of these courses may be counted towards another major, minor, or general education requirement.  The student, after consulting with their advisor, will prepare a brief rationale explaining their selection of courses and how their proposed B.A. plan of study applies to their post-graduate interests and objectives.

    Approved Courses for the Biology Major and Minor

    All 200- and 300-level courses may be used to meet major or minor requirements with the following exceptions:

    BIOL 219 Human Anatomy w/Lab

    BIOL 387 Biology Seminar

    BIOL 388 Individual Internship

    BIOL 389 Independent Study

    BIOL 391 Honors Seminar I

    BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II

    BIOL 394 Undergraduate Research

    BIOL 395 Undergraduate Research

    Biochemistry (CHEM 326) may count toward the major or minor as a non-lab 300-level biology course.
  • Minor

    The Biology Minor

    Note: The grade point average of the coursework in biology and chemistry must be no less than 2.00 with no course grade below C- (1.7).

    Six units, including:

    BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking or BIOL 192 Science Math and Research Training with Laboratory I

    BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I

    BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II

    Two additional units in Biology, at or above the 200 level, at least one with lab

    CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry or CHEM 192 Science, Math, and Research Training II

    Approved Courses for the Biology Major and Minor

    All 200- and 300-level courses may be used to meet major or minor requirements with the following exceptions:

    BIOL 219 Human Anatomy w/Lab

    BIOL 260 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    BIOL 387 Biology Seminar

    BIOL 388 Individual Internship

    BIOL 389 Independent Study

    BIOL 391 Honors Seminar I

    BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II

    BIOL 394 Undergraduate Research

    BIOL 395 Undergraduate Research

    Biochemistry (CHEM 326) may count toward the major or minor as a non-lab 300-level biology course.
  • Honors

    Honors Program

    Students are eligible for the honors program after completing at least 18.5 units of course work (with at least 3.5 units in Biology at the 200 level or higher) and GPAs of 3.3 or higher overall and in Biology. A student may earn honors in biology by completing the following requirements:
    1. A minimum GPA of 3.30 in biology and overall;
    2. Two units total of an approved research experience (may be satisfied by a combination of 0.5 unit and 1 unit research courses taken over multiple semesters);
    3. One unit of biology in addition to those already required for the major. A grade of B or above in this course would allow it to count towards the honors degree;
    4. BIOL 391 Honors Seminar I;
    5. BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II; and
    6. Honors thesis written under the supervision of a research advisor and presented to the department in an oral presentation.

    Students may contact Dan Pierce, Assistant Professor of Biology, for more information.
  • Related
  • Additional

    Marine and Ecosystem Studies

    Opportunities are available to study marine biology or marine and other ecosystems through cooperative agreements with the Duke University Marine Sciences Laboratory (DUML), Beaufort, N.C., and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., Semester in Environmental Science (MBL-SES). Work taken in the program may be included in the student's University of Richmond curriculum only with the prior approval and under the direction of the Department of Biology. Students interested in this option are encouraged to apply to the department for further information.

Courses

Expand All
  • BIOL 108 Environmental Biology with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Basic ecological principles and selected topics in environmental science, including worldwide impact of growing human population, patterns of energy consumption, and issues of water quality, water management, land use, and biological resources. Application of the scientific method will be incorporated in laboratory component. Will not serve as basis of further work in science nor meet entrance requirements for any health profession. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

  • BIOL 109 Introduction to Ecology with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Introduction to causes and consequences of ecological patterns at all scales: individuals, species, communities, and ecosystems. Terrestrial, aquatic, and marine systems are studied, as well as theories and the mathematical and graphical models used to understand them. Some labs require work outside. Will not serve as basis for further work in science nor meet entrance requirements for any health profession. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Same as Environmental Studies 109.

  • BIOL 111 Marine Biology of the Chesapeake Bay with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Introduction to the ecology and biological diversity of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Environmental issues facing the bay will be explored through direct data collection, observation, and hands-on activities. This is a service-learning course and students will join local 5th-grade classrooms to help teach elementary students about the bay. Will not serve as basis for further work in science nor meet entrance requirements for any health profession. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Same as Environmental Studies 111.

  • BIOL 120 Modern Concepts in Biology with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Scientific reasoning as applied in biology. Different sections may address different topics, but each one will study the nature of evidence and how knowledge is gained in biology through diligent observation or controlled experimentation. Assumes completion of high school chemistry and biology. Designed for students not majoring in the sciences. Does not satisfy biology requirements for graduate school or the health professions. Repeatable for credit if topics differ. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

  • BIOL 192 Science, Math and Research Training I with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Year-long course provides an, interdisciplinary, integrated introduction to biology and chemistry, with an accompanying integrated lab. Based on the material in the first course of the major in each of these disciplines, this course will focus on current scientific problems facing today's world such as HIV/AIDS or antibiotic resistance. The course is team taught by two faculty members, one from each discipline. Teaching will be integrated so that links between concepts are readily apparent and students are stimulated to think beyond traditional science methodology. The laboratory will be comprised of hands-on and investigation based experiences using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. The SMART course is designed for students considering a major in either biology or chemistry and also meets requirements for students who go on to study medicine or other health sciences fields. To be taken in consecutive semesters in the first year and with an accompanying year-long calculus course. Completion of the full year of SMART (CHEM 192) will substitute for CHEM141 and BIOL 199. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours per week.

  • BIOL 199 Introduction to Biological Thinking with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    An introduction to how biologists pose questions, design experiments, analyze data, evaluate evidence, and communicate scientific information. Individual sections will have different topics and formats, but all sections will involve intensive student-directed investigation and include a laboratory component. Required for prospective biology majors and biochemistry and molecular biology majors. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Same as ENVR 199.

  • BIOL 200 Integrated Biological Principles I with lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    First of two-part series on the fundamental principles of biology. Examines genetics, cellular and molecular biology, and physiology within the context of biological evolution. Builds upon the competencies and skills learned in BIOL 199. Serves as preparation for upper level biology courses and beyond. Intended for majors in biology and biochemistry and molecular biology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    (BIOL 192 or BIOL 199) and [CHEM 141 or CHEM 192 (CHEM may be taken concurrently)]

  • BIOL 202 Integrated Biological Principles II with lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Second of two-part series on the fundamental principles of biology. Examines organismal physiology and ecology within the context of biological evolution. Builds upon the competencies and skills learned in BIOL 199 and 200 Serves as preparation for upper level biology courses and beyond. Intended for majors in biology and biochemistry and molecular biology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 200

  • BIOL 206 Cell Structure and Function SA with lab

    Units: 1.5

    Description

    Introduction to general aspects of animal cell structure and associated physiology. Overview of cell shape and form, and cell and tissue types, along with intracellular organelles. Investigates the function cell membranes in maintaining homeostasis. Investigates in more detail the cellular function of nerve, muscle, and blood cells, and signaling by endocrine and immune system cells. Taught at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. Fall semester only.

    Prerequisites

    (BIOL192 or BIOL199) and (CHEM141 or CHEM192)

  • BIOL 207 Ecology with lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Examines forces that shape the patterns of species interactions, abundance and distribution. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week plus overnight field trips.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL192 or BIOL199 or CHEM112 or CHEM141 or CHEM192 or ENVR 201

  • BIOL 216 Botany with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Diversity, structure, growth, physiology, and reproduction of photosynthetic organisms. Three lecture and three laboratory hours a week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 192 or BIOL 199 or CHEM 112 or ENVR 201 or permission of instructor

  • BIOL 219 Human Anatomy with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Survey of basic human anatomy, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. For students in allied health fields. Does not count toward the Biology major or minor. Students may not receive credit for both BIOL 219 and BIOL 308: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 200 with a C-.

  • BIOL 220 Human Physiology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    A study of the human nervous, sensory, skeletal muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Emphasis will be placed on forging conceptual links between biology at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ levels and the function (and dysfunction) of the human body. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    (CHEM 141 or CHEM 192 and BIOL 200 or BIOL 206) and permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 225 Evolution with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to biological evolution, including history of field and mechanisms of evolution that result in biological diversification, speciation, extinction, and the fossil record. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 229 Microbiology with lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Microorganisms are everywhere and an integral part of our world. This course introduces a broad range of topics in the field, including microbial cell structure and function, microbial growth and nutrition, unique aspects of microbial metabolism, viruses, microbial ecology, and microbial pathogenesis. The contributions of microbes to the world, both positive and negative, will be highlighted throughout the course. Laboratory investigations will allow students to explore microbiological-based questions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 303 Plant Morphology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Structure, life histories, and phylogeny of major divisions of algae, fungi, and terrestrial plants. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 304 Medical Botany

    Units: 1

    Description

    Medically significant plants, the biologically active compounds that they make, and how plant-derived drugs and poisons modulate human biochemistry, cell biology, and/or physiology.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 200 with a C-.

  • BIOL 306 Systematic Botany with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Identification and classification of vascular plants; emphasis on local flora, principles of systematics. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 307 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology

    Units: 1

    Description

    Analysis of molecular mechanisms by which cells interact with each other and the environment. Topics include signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and molecular models of cancer and microbial pathogenesis. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 308 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Comparative anatomy and biology of several systems of organs of representative vertebrates in an evolutionary context. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 310 The Science of Poisoning

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to the basic concepts of toxicology as they apply to the effects of environmental agents (i.e. chemicals, metals, and biological molecules) on public health. Discussion of the distribution, metabolism, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental laws that govern the interaction of foreign chemicals with biological systems. Examines the effects of classic toxicants on the major organ systems. Focus on the application of concepts to the understanding and prevention of morbidities and mortalities that result from environmental exposures to toxic substances. Uses case studies and published scientific literature.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 312 Developmental Biology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Development of animals, concentrating on fertilization and early embryonic development. Emphasizes mechanisms of cell differentiation and pattern formation. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 313 Microbial Pathogenesis with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Exploration of the general mechanisms used by pathogens to cause disease. Topics include entry into the host, attachment to and invasion of host cells, cell and tissue damage, and microbial elimination/dissemination, as well as the techniques used to study these processes. Students will examine these topics in detail in context of several specific pathogens to more thoroughly appreciate the clinical disease that results from infection. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 314 Molecular Biology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Exploration of the molecular mechanism of genome maintenance, expression, and evolution in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanisms of gene regulation will be emphasized, using primary literature to introduce new discoveries in the field. Topics include transcription and translation regulation, genome editing, and epigenetics. The lab will focus on using modern molecular techniques to address novel questions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 315 Landscape Ecology

    Units: 1

    Description

    (See Geography 315.)

    Prerequisites

    GEOG 250 or ENVR 201 or BIOL 202 or BIOL 207, or permission of instructor

  • BIOL 317 Mechanochemical Cell Biology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Focuses on the chemical and physical nature of cellular function, and the approaches used to study cells. Topics include biophysical principles, kinetics, macromolecular self-assembly, and the impact of regulatory mechanisms on cellular properties. Laboratory component includes an active research project studying the machinery of cell division, including quantitative microscopy approaches. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 320 Experimental Design and Biostatistics

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introductory course in designing, analyzing, and interpreting biological experiments. This course is structured to develop students' understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, how to implement those methods using statistical software, and how to effectively communicate the analyses. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests. Additional topics may include multivariate methods, randomization tests, and Bayesian statistics.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 322 Cancer Biology and Tumorigenesis with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Examination of the past, present, and future of cancer biology. Surveys the molecular/cellular mechanisms that drive cancer and tumor formation through analysis of primary literature and student-led discussions.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 324 Molecular Virology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Exploration of the molecular biology of viruses. Topics include virus entry, viral gene expression, genome replication, assembly, and exit. Each step of the viral life cycle will be illustrated through examples of well-studied viruses, accompanied by primary literature readings. Laboratory involves development of a virologist skill set and designing and carrying out self-directed experiments. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-. CHEM 326 is recommended.

  • BIOL 330 Urban Ecology and Evolution

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to arguably the most interesting biodiversity shift of our time. Surveys the ecological and evolutionary patterns and processes experienced by organisms in cities. Exploration of the patterns across Richmond┬┐s urban core, using species surveys, GIS exercises, and genomic assessments of adaptation to understand how species persist or thrive in this new urban environment.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 (for Biology majors) or relevant BIOL 199, BIOL/ENVR109, ENVR199 and instructor permission for Environmental Studies or other majors.

  • BIOL 331 Molecular Ecology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Examines how molecular genetic techniques are used to study ecological and evolutionary processes in natural populations. Relying heavily on the primary literature, explores methods for evaluating population genetic structure, studying the adaptation of organisms to changing environments, and assessing quantitative predictions from ecological and evolutionary theory. Applied topics covered include molecular identification, hybridization, conservation genetics, transgene escape, the evolution of invasive species, and environmental genomics. The laboratory will emphasize experimental design and training in molecular techniques commonly used in molecular ecology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 333 Microbial Ecology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Community dynamics play an important role in organismal interactions. Examines the role of microorganisms in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats, as well as animal-plant systems. The laboratory will emphasize molecular techniques used to study microorganisms in situ and includes independent research project. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202.

  • BIOL 335 Structural Biology

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to the study of molecular structures of macromolecules using techniques such as X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and electron microscopy. Covers mathematical theory behind X-ray and electron diffraction phenomena and computational modeling of macromolecules. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-. CHEM 326 and PHYS 132 recommended.

  • BIOL 336 Eco-epidemiology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Explores various ways environmental heterogeneity influences disease risk in humans, with specific emphasis on diseases harbored by wildlife species and transmitted by arthropod vectors. Molecular, field-based, computational, and geospatial approaches to characterizing and studying infectious disease dynamics. Readings draw heavily from primary scientific literature. Development of research ideas and implementation of group investigations. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 338 Comparative Animal Physiology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to major characteristics of animal function at level of whole organism and component structures and organ systems. Emphasis on physiological function and processes related to survival in natural environment. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 340 Introduction to Immunology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Overview of immunology. Current theories and their explanation of pertinent contemporary issues included. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 341 Animal Physiological Ecology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to animal physiological adaptation to the natural environment. Emphasis will be on physiological responses of animals to both biotic and abiotic factors and interaction with ecology and population dynamics of species. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 342 Neurodevelopment

    Units: 1

    Description

    Interdisciplinary and integrative area of biology that studies the cellular, molecular and physiological processes by which a field of (ectodermal) cells give rise to a multicellular, three-dimensional nervous system with specialized cell types that are organized into tissues with sensory, motor and cognitive functions.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202.

  • BIOL 343 Neurobiology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Broad course focusing on study of neurons and neuronal systems. Topics to be explored include the neuron and its mechanisms for the transmission of signals, neuronal organization, sensory perception, integration, behavioral output, development, and basic neurogenetics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 344 Behavioral Ecology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to analysis of behavior of organisms, including humans, by study of how behavior affects survival and reproduction. Behaviors studied include foraging, aggression, cooperation, and reproduction. Verbal, graphical, and mathematical models to describe and predict behavior are studied and tested. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week; may include overnight field trips.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 346 Medical Entomology with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduces students to biology of medically important arthropods, life cycles of transmitted pathogens, disease symptoms and epidemiology. Discusses the economic and social impact of these arthropods and strategies for their control; covers unorthodox points of intersection between entomology and medical sciences, including psychiatry, surgery and forensic medicine.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 351 Special Topics

    Units: .5-1

    Description

    Special course areas covered when sufficient interest exists. Considers subject matter not covered in other biology courses. Three lecture hours per week. Some topics will include three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 354 Biological Basis of Neurodegenerative Diseases with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Examines the biological mechanisms that underlie human neurodegenerative diseases. Also examines the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of diseases like Alzheimer, Huntington, and Parkinson diseases by discovering how normal biological processes fail and lead to neuronal death. Also examines the biological basis of potential cures. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 360 Human Evolutionary Genomics with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Focus on how genomic tools have helped to elucidate human migration patterns, reveal admixture with closely related populations (i.e. Neanderthals), uncover selective pressures, and clarify our place within the Primate order. Covers some basic population genetic and phylogenetic theory and examines the social context of research in the field of human evolutionary genomics. Lab uses human genomic datasets to introduce computational tools used in these fields and address questions related to human evolution.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 190 or 192 or 199 and BIOL 200 and 202.

  • BIOL 380 Philosophical Issues in Evolutionary Biology

    Units: 1

    Description

    Philosophical problems within evolutionary biology and its influence on society. Issues studied include how natural selection works, evolution and human behaviors, and the influence of evolutionary theory on our ethical and legal codes. Lecture/seminar format, with student presentations and term paper. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 381 Advanced Topics in Ecology

    Units: 1

    Description

    Discussion-based course exploring the development of ecological theories in scientific literature from the foundations of the discipline through contemporary research and cutting-edge approaches. Readings draw from contemporary and foundational scientific research articles; critical analysis and discussion of the methods, data, and ideas found in each paper. Culminates in the development of one or more synthetic projects such as a synthesis paper that approaches current and historical thinking on a foundational ecological theory, and or a team-developed educational lab module that could hypothetically be used to teach undergraduate ecology students. The specific topical content of this course will vary by semester.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 382 Conservation Biology

    Units: 1

    Description

    Study of biological diversity (species, habitats, ecosystems) and efforts to conserve it. Specific topics may include ecological models of population regulation, coexistence, maximum sustainable harvest rates and minimum viable population size. Study of local, national and/or international policies for the conservation of biodiversity. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 383 Tropical Biology and Conservation with Lab

    Units: 1

    Description

    Introduction to principles of tropical biology and conservation, including historical and economic components. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 387 Biology Seminar

    Units: .25

    Description

    Regular attendance in program seminars and written analysis of presentations. May be repeated for credit, normally taken in junior year. Meets one hour per week.

    Prerequisites

    Instructor approval

  • BIOL 388 Individual Internship

    Units: .5

    Description

    Supervised independent work under field conditions. Designed to give student applied experience in biological specialty. No more than 1.5 units of internship in any one department and 3.5 units of internship overall may be counted toward required degree units.

    Prerequisites

    Biology, biochemistry and molecular biology, or environmental studies major at junior or senior rank and instructor approval.

  • BIOL 389 Independent Study

    Units: .25-1

    Description

    An in-depth study of biological topics not included in other courses. Students work independently, but under the supervision of a faculty member. Must be approved by department chair and instructor.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 390 Advances in Biology

    Units: .5

    Description

    Engages students with discoveries at the boundaries of traditional biology disciplines and examine the kinds of questions researchers ask about living systems. The course builds upon foundational concepts in introductory biology courses and studies research fields for which an interdisciplinary approach is needed to advance our understanding. No individual topic may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 202 with a C-.

  • BIOL 391 Honors Seminar I

    Units: .25

    Description

    Special topics for junior and senior students with emphasis on topics presented in the Biology Seminar Series. One lecture hour per week.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 392 Honors Seminar II

    Units: .25

    Description

    Special topics for junior and senior honors candidates. One lecture hour per week.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 394 Undergraduate Research

    Units: 0.5

    Description

    Independent research conducted with faculty supervision. May be repeated eight times for credit.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 395 Undergraduate Research

    Units: 1

    Description

    Laboratory or field-centered independent study. May be taken twice for credit.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor.

  • BIOL 406 Summer Undergraduate Research

    Units: 0

    Description

    Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.

    Prerequisites

    Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor

Courses

Expand All
  • BIOL 192 Science, Math and Research Training I with lab

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNB)

    Description

    Year-long course provides an, interdisciplinary, integrated introduction to biology and chemistry, with an accompanying integrated lab. Based on the material in the first course of the major in each of these disciplines, this course will focus on current scientific problems facing today's world such as HIV/AIDS or antibiotic resistance. The course is team taught by two faculty members, one from each discipline. Teaching will be integrated so that links between concepts are readily apparent and students are stimulated to think beyond traditional science methodology. The laboratory will be comprised of hands-on and investigation based experiences using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. The SMART course is designed for students considering a major in either biology or chemistry and also meets requirements for students who go on to study medicine or other health sciences fields. To be taken in consecutive semesters in the first year and with an accompanying year-long calculus course. Completion of the full year of SMART (CHEM 192) will substitute for CHEM141 and BIOL 199. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours per week.

  • CHEM 192 Science, Math and Research Training II

    Units: 1

    Fulfills General Education Requirement FSNC

    Description

    Year-long course provides an, interdisciplinary, integrated introduction to biology and chemistry, with an accompanying integrated lab. Based on the material in the first course of the major in each of these disciplines, this course will focus on current scientific problems facing today's world such as HIV/AIDS or antibiotic resistance. The course is team taught by two faculty members, one from each discipline. Teaching will be integrated so that links between concepts are readily apparent and students are stimulated to think beyond traditional science methodology. The laboratory will be comprised of hands-on and investigation based experiences using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. The SMART course is designed for students considering a major in either biology or chemistry and also meets requirements for students who go on to study medicine or other health sciences fields. To be taken in consecutive semesters in the first year and with an accompanying year-long calculus course. Completion of the full year of SMART (CHEM 192) will substitute for CHEM141 and BIOL 199. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours per week. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: CHEM 141 or CHEM 192.

    Prerequisites

    BIOL 192.