Leadership Studies
Department Information

Leadership Studies

Jepson School of Leadership Studies

Professors Bezio, Forsyth, Goethals, Hoyt, Kaufman, McDowell, Peart, Price
Associate Professor Williamson
Assistant Professors Flanigan, Harwell, Hayter, Hidalgo, Semán, von Rueden

 

Major

The Leadership Studies Major

Note: The grade point average of the coursework comprising the major must be no less than 2.0, with no course grade below a C- (1.7).

Students wishing to major or minor in leadership studies must apply for admission to the Jepson School of Leadership Studies during the fall semester of their second year.

A minimum of 11 units, including:

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities 
LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences 
LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society 
LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry 
LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership 
LDST 450 Leadership Ethics 
LDST 488 Internship 
Four additional units of advanced courses numbered above 300, not including LDST 450 and LDST 488

Ethical Area Courses

LDST 307 Leadership in International Contexts
LDST 309 Leadership and the Common Good
LDST 355 Competition, Cooperation, and Choice
LDST 361 Sex, Power, and Politics
LDST 368 Leadership on Stage and Screen
LDST 371 Moral Limits of the Criminal Law
LDST 374 Contemporary Debates in Democratic Theory
LDST 376 Leadership and Governance in the Contemporary American Metropolis
LDST 377 Ethical Decision Making - Health Care

Historical Area Courses

LDST 303 Leadership in Political Contexts
LDST 304 Social Movements
LDST 308 The Creation of the American Republic
LDST 340 Early Modern Crises in Leadership
LDST 342 Dead Leaders Society
LDST 345 Civil War Leadership
LDST 352 Presidential Leadership
LDST 378 Statesmanship
LDST 379 Reason, Rhetoric and Leadership
LDST 387 Leadership and Religious Values

Social/Organizational Area Courses

LDST 302 Leadership in Organizations
LDST 306 Leadership in Cultural and Historical Contexts
LDST 320 Good and Evil
LDST 325 Leading Socially Active Businesses
LDST 351 Group Dynamics
LDST 354 Conflict Resolution
LDST 356 Leading Change
LDST 359 Gender and Leadership
LDST 386 Leadership in a Diverse Society

Advanced coursework may include one unit of collaborative study, one unit of independent study, one unit of honors thesis work, or one unit of senior thesis work.

Minor

The Leadership Studies Minor

Note: The grade point average of the coursework comprising the minor must be no less than 2.0, with no course grade below a C- (1.7).

A minimum of 8 units, including:

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities
LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences
LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society
LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry
LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership
LDST 450 Leadership Ethics
Two additional units of advanced courses numbered above 300, not including leadership ethics, collaborative study, independent study, or thesis work.

Ethical Area Courses

LDST 307 Leadership in International Contexts
LDST 309 Leadership and the Common Good
LDST 355 Competition, Cooperation, and Choice
LDST 361 Sex, Power, and Politics
LDST 368 Leadership on Stage and Screen
LDST 371 Moral Limits of the Criminal Law
LDST 374 Contemporary Debates in Democratic Theory
LDST 376 Leadership and Governance in the Contemporary American Metropolis
LDST 377 Ethical Decision Making - Health Care

Historical Area Courses

LDST 303 Leadership in Political Contexts
LDST 304 Social Movements
LDST 308 The Creation of the American Republic
LDST 340 Early Modern Crises in Leadership
LDST 342 Dead Leaders Society
LDST 345 Civil War Leadership
LDST 352 Presidential Leadership
LDST 378 Statesmanship
LDST 379 Reason, Rhetoric and Leadership
LDST 387 Leadership and Religious Values

Social/Organizational Area Courses

LDST 302 Leadership in Organizations
LDST 306 Leadership in Cultural and Historical Contexts
LDST 320 Good and Evil
LDST 325 Leading Socially Active Businesses
LDST 351 Group Dynamics
LDST 354 Conflict Resolution
LDST 356 Leading Change
LDST 359 Gender and Leadership
LDST 386 Leadership in a Diverse Society
Honors

Honors in Leadership Studies

The Jepson School faculty offers a track by which students with a proven academic record of intellectual initiative and scholarly drive can earn honors in leadership studies. The faculty invites interested students to apply for the honors track. The deadline for this application is October 1 of the student's junior year. To qualify, a student must be a leadership studies major, hold at least a 3.30 cumulative GPA and at least a 3.30 leadership studies GPA, and have earned a B or higher in at least four leadership studies courses. The application form is available for qualified juniors from the associate dean for academic affairs.

Once accepted to the honors track, in order to receive honors in leadership studies, a student must:

Enroll in LDST 399 Junior Honors Tutorial, for spring semester of junior year.

Submit a five-page proposal and preliminary bibliography to be accepted by the course instructor and a Jepson faculty thesis advisor.

Enroll in LDST 497 and LDST 498, Senior Honors Thesis I and II, during senior year.

Successfully present one chapter, bibliography, and chapter-by-chapter outline of thesis to the student's committee by the last day of classes in the fall semester of senior year.

Successfully defend thesis before the student's committee by the last day of classes in the spring semester of senior year.

Complete undergraduate program with at least a 3.30 cumulative GPA and at least a 3.30 leadership studies GPA.

Students in the honors track must complete all aspects of the standard Jepson curriculum. LDST 497 and LDST 498 can count for a maximum of one unit of advanced course credit.

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Leadership studies students are encouraged to study abroad. Majors may count a maximum of one unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student's academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student's academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students are encouraged to study abroad in the spring of junior year, although alternate arrangements typically can be made to accommodate students planning to study abroad in the fall of junior year.
Courses
FYS 100 First Year Seminar
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement First Year Seminar
Description
Allows students to choose from a list of special topics courses while they pursue a shared set of educational goals. All seminars are designed to expand the students' understanding of the world, enhance their ability to read and think critically, enhance their ability to communicate effectively in writing, speech, and other appropriate forms, develop fundamentals of information literacy and library research, and provide the opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty mentor. Topics descriptions for each term can be found on the FYS website. Students must take two different FYS 100 courses to meet the First Year Seminar degree requirement.
Prerequisites
First-year standing.

FYS 101 First Year Seminar
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement First Year Seminar
Description
Allows students to choose from a list of special topics courses while they pursue a shared set of educational goals. All seminars are designed to expand the students' understanding of the world, enhance their ability to read and think critically, enhance their ability to communicate effectively in writing, speech, and other appropriate forms, develop fundamentals of information literacy and library research, and provide the opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty mentor. Topics descriptions for each term can be found on the FYS website. Students must take two different FYS courses to meet the First Year Seminar degree requirement.

FYS 102 First Year Seminar
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement First Year Seminar
Description
Allows students to choose from a list of special topics courses while they pursue a shared set of educational goals. All seminars are designed to expand the students' understanding of the world, enhance their ability to read and think critically, enhance their ability to communicate effectively in writing, speech, and other appropriate forms, develop fundamentals of information literacy and library research, and provide the opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty mentor. Topics descriptions for each term can be found on the FYS website. Students must take two different FYS courses to meet the First Year Seminar degree requirement.
Prerequisites
FYS 101

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to leadership as an object of study through examination of its historical foundations and intellectual development. Readings selected from history, literature, philosophy, political theory, religion, and social theory. Emphasis on assessing these texts in light of reasoned argument and on drawing out their implications for leadership studies. This course may be taken before or after LDST 102.

LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSSA
Description
Introduction to the study of leadership through theoretical and empirical explorations of social interaction. Readings selected from anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology. Emphasis on advancing the understanding of leadership through an increased appreciation of the rich complexities of human behavior. This course may be taken before or after LDST 101.

LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society
Units: 1
Description
Exploration of contemporary society and understandings of justice. Readings on civil society, theories of justice, and analysis of poverty and related socio-economic problems. Includes a service learning component with critical reflection on community service to populations in need.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.

LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry
Units: 1
Description
Examination of knowledge and argumentation as they pertain to leadership. Analysis of scientific methodology and logic, language and interpretation, and their influence on the study and practice of leadership.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 101 or 102, and admission to the Jepson School of Leadership Studies as a major or minor.

LDST 290 Selected Topics
Units: .5-1
Description
Topics developed by Jepson school faculty, visiting faculty, or faculty in other schools of the University that address particular issues in leadership studies. Examples may include leadership studies courses in the Sophomore Scholars in Residence program. May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary.
Prerequisites
Varies depending on topic.

LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership
Units: 1
Description
Examination of theories and models in leadership studies. Introduces role of theory in social science, and both classic and contemporary leadership theories/models are presented. Emphasis on critical analysis of theoretical perspectives.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 101 and 102, and admission to the Jepson School of Leadership Studies as a major or minor.

LDST 302 Leadership in Organizations
Units: 1
Description
Focus on leadership theory and research within and across formal organizational settings such as public/private, profit/nonprofit, professional/nonprofessional, and unitary/multidivisional. Examination of rational, natural, and open systems, and of how leadership differs in each system. Primary focus social/organizational.

LDST 303 Leadership in Political Contexts
Units: 1
Description
Informal and formal processes by which power and authority are exercised and leadership is selected within political systems in various settings. Examination of leadership in basic processes and institutions of government through case study of legislative issues. Primary focus historical.

LDST 304 Social Movements
Units: 1
Description
Exploration of history of leadership in social movements. Comparison and contrast of forms, mechanisms, and practices of leadership in various stages of a social movement. Examination of values of leaders as expressed through stories of ordinary people involved in leadership in social movements. Primary focus historical.

LDST 306 Sex, Leadership, and the Evolution of Human Societies
Units: 1
Description
Study of how biological and cultural adaptation shape leadership and, more broadly, political organization. Through cases studies drawn from primatology, cultural anthropology, and political history, students will learn about what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human and non-human societies. Some of the questions we consider include: Why do humans adopt leader and follower roles at all? What is the political organization of other social animals, particularly the great apes? Are there any human societies that lack leadership? Are there societies in which, on average, women wield more power than men? Why are some human societies more hierarchical than others? The goal of the course is not only to expose students to the diversity of political organization in humans and other animals but also to stimulate them to think critically about the ultimate causes of human social behavior in general.

LDST 307 Leadership in International Contexts
Units: 1
Description
Examines the ethics of international leadership. Students will consider ethical issues relating to international affairs that leaders and followers confront in politics, the military, business, and the nonprofit sectors. Topics include war, global poverty, migration, and international institutions. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 308 The Creation of the American Republic
Units: 1
Description
Examines principles and practice of leadership within political context of the founding of the American Republic from 1776 through 1788. Primary focus will be on day-to-day work of the Constitutional Convention and the subsequent debates over ratification of the new constitution. Primary focus historical. (Same as Political Science 330.)

LDST 310 Folk Music and Protest Thought
Units: 1
Description
An exploration of leadership in the arts that will examine the subject from three perspectives. First, it will consider figures in traditional, old-time, and folk music whose contributions have been transformative. Second, consideration will be given to folk music as a variety of American political and social thought, as an expression of ideas about human nature and the politics of the day. Finally, there will be an evaluation of the persuasive power of song as a rhetorical means of spreading, and perhaps inculcating political and social ideas in the minds of the people. Primary focus historical.

LDST 317 Reimagining Richmond: History, Power and Politics in the Capital of the Confederacy
Units: 1
Description
The role of historical context and leadership in shaping urban development, particularly the development of Richmond, Virginia. Study of Richmond's history from the colonial era, through Reconstruction, and into the twentieth century, including how historical actors used politics and leadership to transform local power relationships. Analysis of the eras of slavery and Jim Crow, reimagination of twentieth century urban history and the American civil rights movement.

LDST 340 Early Modern Crises in Leadership
Units: 1
Description
Discussion of primary texts that disclose difficulties in formulating political and religious policy during the crises that start with the later Middle Ages in Western Europe and run into the seventeenth century. Students will be expected to evaluate as well currently influential interpretations of the crises and proposed resolutions. Specific subjects will be selected from a menu that includes medieval papal imperialism and decline, the development of early modern secular bureaucracies, Renaissance political theory, religious reformations, and religious wars as well as Machiavelli, More, Luther, Calvin, Whitgift, Lord Burghley, Queen Elizabeth I, Emperor Charles V, and King Henry IV (France). Primary focus historical.

LDST 345 Civil War Leadership
Units: 1
Description
A study of the events leading to the Civil War, and the military and political leadership on both Union and Confederate sides during the war. Topics include the roles of slavery and political leadership in starting the war, the leadership of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis during the war, and that of Generals Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, George B. McClellan, and William T. Sherman in shaping the outcome of the war. Primary focus historical.

LDST 351 Group Dynamics
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to scientific study of group processes through vocabulary, concepts, theories, and research. Both classic and contemporary theories and research are presented. Emphasis on both theoretical and applied components of group dynamics. Primary focus social/organizational.

LDST 352 Presidential Leadership
Units: 1
Description
A study of theories of presidential leadership and assessments of several presidencies, including those of George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. Addresses the personal qualities and capacities as well as the situational and historical contingencies that influence the effectiveness of various presidencies. Also considers the nature of social perception and its role in appraisals of presidential performance. Special attention will be given to presidential campaigning and presidential debates. Each student will undertake the study of one or more presidents. Primary focus historical. (Same as Psychology 449.)

LDST 354 Conflict Resolution
Units: 1
Description
Understanding principles and dynamics of mediating disputes and achieving agreements between groups and individuals. Discussion of negotiating techniques and ethical issues related to use of such techniques by leaders. Use of simulations and exercises to practice skills for resolving conflicts. Primary focus social/organizational.

LDST 355 Competition, Cooperation, and Choice
Units: 1
Description
Economic approach to leadership examines how individuals come together in social settings (a market place, an organization, a political entity) to make distributive decisions. Particular focus on Adam Smith's analysis of the development of modern industrial society and on important policy debates about slavery, the franchise and eugenics. Consideration of Smithian insights applied to contemporary game theoretic and experimental research on the emergence of cooperative behavior in settings where individual interests sometimes conflict with the interest of the group (or society). Special attention to public goods games and institutional frameworks that facilitate cooperation in a repeated prisoner's dilemma setting: competition, repetition, punishment, and reciprocity. Primary focus ethical.
Prerequisites
ECON 101

LDST 361 Sex, Power, and Politics
Units: 1
Description
Explores the processes by which "sexuality" is constituted and informs the leadership process. Readings on the social construction of gender, theories of power, and conceptions of freedom will be coupled with analyses of policy debates on issues such as reproductive freedom, pornography, and gay rights. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 368 Leadership on Stage and Screen
Units: 1
Description
Discussion of primary dramatic texts and films that examine leadership in a variety of settings and frameworks. Uses critical readings to contextualize the works as commentary on the issues and crises of leadership present at the time of their creation and examines the way in which they continue to address ethical and logistical leadership concerns in later periods and alternative contexts. In addition, discussions will focus on the use of film and theater as vehicles for questions of sociopolitical change and ethical inquiry. Course expectations include a theatrical production project working in the greater Richmond community designed to use the theatrical experience to enact social justice and examine leadership at work. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 371 Moral Limits of the Criminal Law
Units: 1
Description
Engages John Stuart Mill's project to determine "the nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual." The starting point for the course is Mill's defense of the "harm principle" in On Liberty. Discussions address questions about whether we would be justified in using the criminal law to limit the liberty of individuals who engage in offensive behavior, behavior that is harmful only to the actors themselves, or behavior that is thought to be immoral. Readings from thinkers such as James Fitzjames Stephen, Patrick Devlin, H.L A. Hart, and Joel Feinberg. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 374 Contemporary Debates in Democratic Theory
Units: 1
Description
Examination of contemporary debates in democratic theory, drawing primarily on writings of political theorists supplemented by scholarship in empirical political science, sociology, and political economy as appropriate. Specific topics examined may include the distribution of political and economic power in democratic societies; the relationship between political institutions and economic actors; the role of citizens in sustaining democratic regimes; the role of normative values in public-policy making; the role of deliberation in democratic societies; and possibilities for institutional reform to expand democratic self-governance. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 375 Economic Policy and Leadership
Units: 1
Description
Explores two questions using debates amongst economists as our policy laboratory. First, what is the scope for policy makers to lead the economy through crises and the inevitable ups and downs that accompany economic expansion? How much agency should policy makers assume and when are unusual mechanisms called for? Second, what leadership role do economists legitimately play in the development and implementation of new economic policy? As we read and discuss the policy proposals of the past, we explore the answers to these and other questions in today's economic contexts. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 377 Ethical Decision Making - Health Care
Units: 1
Description
Systematic examination of the central ethical decisions faced by leaders in medicine and healthcare. Topics include deception, decision making for incompetent patients, consent, abortion, euthanasia, disability, resource allocation, organ donation, and experimentation with human and non human animals. Readings by historical thinkers such as Jeremy Bentham, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. Contemporary readings from bioethicists such as John Finnis, Judith Jarvis Thompson, Derek Parfit, Jonathan Glover, James Rachels, Peter Singer, and Ronald Dworkin. Primary focus ethical.

LDST 378 Statesmanship
Units: 1
Description
Focus on statesmanship through historical and biographical case studies of such figures as the American founders, Abraham Lincoln, and Winston Churchill. Also will seek to understand ways in which constitutional, legal, and political institutions can encourage, thwart, or direct leadership on a grand political scale. Primary focus historical. (Same as Political Science 310.)

LDST 379 Reason, Rhetoric, and Leadership
Units: 1
Description
Consideration of the relationship between rhetoric and leadership. Focus will be on such examples as Thucydides' "History of the Peloponnesian War," the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist Papers," and the oratory of Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill. Primary focus historical. (Same as Political Science 316.)

LDST 383 Leadership and the Future of Higher Education
Units: 1
Description
Examines issues of leadership in higher education. Focus on how presidents work with constituents to achieve legitimacy, guide plans, and make decisions. Explore both traditional and emerging models in higher education. Primary focus social/organizational.

LDST 386 Leadership in a Diverse Society
Units: 1
Description
Study of how diversity affects social relations with an emphasis on leadership. Examines diversity, primarily through the lens of social psychology, by examining individual and collective dynamics in pluralistic settings. The primary focus is to familiarize students with basic research on intergroup relations, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, so that they may: (1) evaluate and analyze the scientific merit of this research, and (2) apply this research to real world situations--e.g., reflect on the effect of social identity on achievement, performance, mental health, physical health, etc. Focuses on the causes, correlates and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Also addresses approaches to ameliorating these problems. Primary focus social/organizational.

LDST 387 Leadership and Religious Values
Units: 1
Description
Study of how political, cultural, and religious leaders draw on and influence their respective religious traditions. Primary focus: historical.

LDST 389 Research Methods
Units: 1
Description
In-depth examination of various research methods used in leadership studies. Consideration of issues associated with design of studies, collection of various kinds of data, writing research proposals and reports, and analysis of data.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 101 or 102 and admission to the Jepson School of Leadership Studies as a major or minor.

LDST 390 Selected Topics
Units: .5-1
Description
Topics developed by Jepson School faculty, visiting faculty, or faculty in other schools of the University that address particular issues in leadership studies. Examples may include leadership and psychology and literature and leadership. May be taken more than once if topics vary.
Prerequisites
Varies depending on topic.

LDST 399 Junior Honors Tutorial
Units: .5
Description
Juniors accepted to honors track (in fall of junior year) work with Jepson faculty members in this spring tutorial to develop thesis proposal and preliminary bibliography to be accepted by the course instructor and a Jepson faculty thesis advisor.
Prerequisites
Acceptance to honors track.

LDST 406 Summer Undergraduate Research
Units: 0
Description
Documentation of the work of students who receive summer grants to conduct research in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 10 weeks, and the student must be the recipient of a Jepson School summer research grant. Graded S/U.
Prerequisites
Approval for summer research grant by Jepson School Student Affairs Committee

LDST 450 Leadership Ethics
Units: 1
Description
Application of moral theory to the values and assumptions of leadership, focusing especially on the ethical challenges of leaders past and present, group behavior, and leadership theory. Topics include self-interest, power, charisma, duty, obedience, and the greater good.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 300. Restricted to senior majors and minors or by permission of instructor.

LDST 488 Internship
Units: .5-1
Description
Applied experience in field of leadership studies and accompanying seminar. Observations of leaders in government, corporate, or nonprofit settings. Students are expected to apply what they have learned in required courses such as Theories and Models. Majors only.

LDST 490 Independent Study
Units: .5-2
Description
Independent study allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals must be submitted to the associate dean for academic affairs at least two weeks before the beginning of classes for the semester in which the independent study is to take place. The independent research experience will culminate in a final written product.
Prerequisites
Department approval.

LDST 491 Collaborative Study
Units: .5-2
Description
Collaborative study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Collaborative study must involve more than providing research assistance to an ongoing project; rather, the student must take responsibility for conducting original research of scholarly value. Collaborative study will be grounded in rigorous methods appropriate to the discipline in which the student is working and will culminate in a final written project.
Prerequisites
Department approval.

LDST 492 Directed Study
Units: 1
Description
Group reading and discussion in a specified area of leadership studies under faculty supervision.
Prerequisites
Department approval.

LDST 495 Senior Thesis I
Units: 1
Description
Year-long engagement in independent research project under supervision of faculty advisor.
Prerequisites
Department approval.

LDST 496 Senior Thesis II
Units: 1
Description
Year-long engagement in independent research project under supervision of faculty advisor.
Prerequisites
Department approval.

LDST 497 Senior Honors Thesis I
Units: 1
Description
Year-long engagement in independent research to produce written thesis worthy of honors in leadership studies. See description of Jepson honors track for further details.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 399 and commitment of a faculty thesis advisor are required to register for 497; in December of senior year, upon oral presentation of research and proposal, Jepson faculty verifies permission to enroll in 498.

LDST 498 Senior Honors Thesis II
Units: 1
Description
Year-long engagement in independent research to produce written thesis worthy of honors in leadership studies. See description of Jepson honors track for further details.
Prerequisites
Leadership Studies 399 and commitment of a faculty thesis advisor are required to register for 497; in December of senior year, upon oral presentation of research and proposal, Jepson faculty verifies permission to enroll in 498.

UNIV 401 University Seminar
Units: .5-1
Description
Inter-disciplinary seminar team-taught by faculty from two or more schools of the University. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
Prerequisites
Junior or senior standing